Our Visit to the Shamba: Day 1

Last week Kakasii needed to visit our shamba (farm) in the village so we decided to make a family trip out of it.

That was no small feat. Packing for Max and Elly is quite involved. In addition to clothes, sippy cups, diapers and wipes, we must not forget Max’s tractors and trucks if we are going to be away from home for more than 10 minutes.

maxstractorsandtrucksWe also needed to take a refrigerator along with us. We bought a bigger fridge for the house in Arusha and wanted to put the smaller fridge in the farmhouse. So Kakasii pulled three of the seats out of the Land Cruiser to make room for the fridge. That didn’t leave much room for the people who were needing to also ride along.

inthecarOur house helpers Anita (left) and Mazaa (right) came along, too.

The drive to the shamba is a little more than an hour. Once we got there it was only a matter of minutes before Kakasii was ready to take Max and Elly on a walk to greet the neighbors. He couldn’t wait to show off his twins! In Tanzania, the father gets all the credit for twins–nevermind I was the one who carried them for 35 weeks!

walkingWith Kakasii, Max and Elly on their way, it was time for Anita, Mazaa and I to clean the house. It had been quite some time since we last stayed in the farmhouse so there was plenty to clean up.

dirtOnce Kakasii and the kids were back from their visiting, it was time for one of the great life lessons kids get on the farm: the circle of life. Max and Elly got to meet their supper.

maxkukuellykukuThe next time they saw that rooster, he was here:

cookfireWhile supper cooked, Max and Elly fed the surviving chickens.

maxfeedingkukuellyfeedingkukuAnd then tormented them by chasing them around the yard.

kukuchasing1And Max of course took one of his tractors out for a ride through the banana fields.

maxtractormaxtractor2After our yummy chicken supper we hit the hay. Fortunately, chasing chickens takes a lot out of Max and Elly so they fell right to sleep.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Little House on Kilimanjaro. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.